Gluten-Free Pumpkin Macademia Nut Pancakes

Pancakes can be traced back to prehistoric times. In fact, they were one of Otzi the Iceman's last meals. Remember him?  His remains were found in 1991 in the Italian Alps and they showed evidence that the last thing he consumed was made of ground einkorn wheat with bits of charcoal, which point to some form of pancake cooked on an open fire.  30,000 year-old grinding tools were analyzed showing traces of ground flour made from cattails and ferns. Researches believe it was mixed with water and cooked on greased stones to create ancient pancakes.  

Pancakes can be traced back to prehistoric times. In fact, they were one of Otzi the Iceman's last meals. Remember him?

Now, I'm guessing they taste NOTHING like modern day crêpes or pancakes.  In fact, I'd even place a bet that if I recreated Otzi's last meal for my kids, it would be met with “Blech! Cardboard!” For Otzi's part, I imagine his Neolithic taste buds would be singing with all the modern variations of pancakes today.

There are many ancient traditions from every country that celebrate pancakes, such as Hanukkah, Shrove Tuesday, and Candlemas.  My family celebrates pancakes at least four days a week.  I think this recipe might convince yours to do the same. It's my husband's absolute favorite.

Gluten-Free Pumpkin Macademia Nut Pancakes

  • 1 cup Pamela's pancake & baking mix (or whatever your favorite gluten-free flour substitute is)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 cup puréed pumpkin with pie spices
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil or melted butter, for a richer taste
  • 1 cup chopped macademia nuts

Makes about eight good-sized pancakes, or 12 dollar-sized. (Of course, for my family I have to triple this recipe.)

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl until smooth. Put a little coconut oil on your griddle (just to add another layer of flavor) and drop your batter on. Then cook, flip, and serve!

Try serving with a dollop of plain yogurt, fresh berries, and maple syrup on top.  So darn yummy! (Much tastier than cattails and ferns mixed with water and cooked on a greased rock.)

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Gina  Stryker

Gina Stryker

Gina D’Orazio Stryker
Founder/Recipe Artist
Gina just loves feeding people. Coming from a long line of Italian chefs, she learned to cook at an early age and always knew that was what she was... Read more>>