How to Lower Your Cholesterol Naturally

Holistic health expert Carrie Demers, MD, offers advice about lowering your cholesterol.

May 17, 2013    BY Carrie Demers

A doctor prescribed a statin medication to me to keep my cholesterol low. What are your thoughts about this medication?

Statin drugs (simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin) lower blood cholesterol levels by blocking your body’s ability to make cholesterol. Because statins also lower levels of the vitamin-like anti-oxidant Coenzyme Q10, which supports heart and skeletal muscle health, they can cause detrimental side effects like muscle pain and weakness, and occasionally heart failure.

Here are some simple ways you can lower your cholesterol naturally:

1. Watch Your Diet

Refrain from consuming refined sugar and white flour. If you aren’t a vegetarian, include wild fish in your diet and take fish oils (1000mg once a day, or 1 tablespoon 1–3 times/day) for their omega-3 fats, which are heart-healthy and anti-inflammatory.

2. Take Niacin

Niacin is a B-vitamin that helps decrease LDL (bad cholesterol) and raise HDL (good cholesterol). LDL stands for “low-density lipoprotein”; HDL stands for “high-density lipoprotein.” Both of these are ways your body has of packaging fats within protein containers. Studies have shown that high LDL is associated with heart disease, and that high HDL protects the heart from disease.

Take 500mg of niacin to start, and gradually increase to as much as 2000mg per day. Note that high doses of this vitamin can cause a temporary flush of heat and even a rash. This reaction often subsides over time.

3. Eat Red Yeast Rice

Red yeast rice is a traditional Chinese medicine for removing “blood blockages.” You can take 600mg of this supplement 2–4 times a day.

4. Manage Your Stress

Stress management also helps keep your cholesterol at a healthy level. Try to practice deep diaphragmatic breathing 10–15 minutes twice a day. And check in with your breath throughout the day—breathe deeply even when you are at your desk. It will help lower your cholesterol, your blood pressure, and your risk for heart disease.

Carrie Demers
Carrie Demers MD, has practiced integrative medicine for 22 years. After earning her medical degree and becoming board-certified in internal medicine, Dr. Demers went on to study massage, homeopathy, yoga, meditation, nutrition, herbal medicine, and ayurveda. She uses all these modalities to support patients’ inherent ability to heal.

Dr. Demers sees patients, writes articles, and lectures nationally on integrative medicine. She is board-certified in integrative medicine, and has been the... Read more>>